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Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)
. nasa reporting it appeared brighter than the sun. traveling at around 40,000 miles an hour, fast enough that if you were to hitch a ride, it would get from you new york to l.a. in four minutes time flat. early estimates were it weighed ten tons. nasa says now more like 7,000. it ripped through the air like a blade through fabric triggering sonic booms and an immense shock wave when it exploded. when it shattered miles above the earth, we're told it released 20 times the energy, more powerful than the hiroshimo bomb in japan. it was powerful enough to knock down doors and shatter windows across one city. officials say more than 1,000 people went for medical treatment. flying glass blamed for most of those injuries. one witness saying when older women in the neighborhood spotted it, they started screaming that the world was ending. and just about everybody seemed a little freaked out. >> it was very confusing because the building was shaking a little bit, so initially i thought it was an earthquake. but then i knew i heard this loud bang, so i thought some sort of explosion, either a gas
-- these are not just a few disgruntled protesters. the lead nasa global warming scientist has announced it's game over for the climate if we approve the keystone pipe will be. gabe was arrested protesting the pipeline. he is nasa's lead scientist endorsed a book calling the world for ridding itself of industrialization by turning off the greenhouse gas machine. this man i interviewed about ecoterror and the pipeline, his inspiration to stop the pipeline. so, the leaders at nasa -- i call them nasa's resident ex-con -- is inspiring these people to point acts of ecoer toism, and they're against all forms of energy, which doesn't make send. if we're getting oil from democracy in canada, that's caught ethical oil, as opposed to getting from nye jeer -- nye nigeria or the middle east. the. >> neil: what is scary, the ends justify the means and if push came to shove and it meant tearing the thing down or doing god know's what, without this oil, it's a better world for us? that is crazy. >> yes, it's not about not in my backyard so much as they're worried about the extra co2 that would be emited in the atmo
. bill: according to nasa, 100 tons of meet toors of gravel and dust hit the atmosphere and the earth every single day. the smaller strikes what we saw in russia happen ten times a year. that's new. scientists believe a strike by a meteor six miles across may have been responsible for extinction of the dinosaurs 66 million years ago. in case you're wondering on a friday have something to do over the weekend you mentioned the asteroid talking about past several days. they say there is no connection between that and this meteor. we'll talk to scientists throughout the morning. heather: a lot of experts. bill: meantime, six minutes past, the nightmare is finally over. what a slow crawl this was. thousands of passengers cheering the end of a cruise ship horror scene. touching land and kissing it like the pope. the carnival cruise triumph docking last night in mobile after putting what passengers through what they call disgusting conditions. now they say they are just happy to be home. who can blame them. >> i feel great to be off the ship and just being on land and, i get to see my family
waves hit us. >> reporter: >> a nasa expert joined us on fox 5 news at 5:00 and said this is extraordinarily rare. >> i have to be honest, will. i am not wear of anything in the history books talking -- not aware of anything in the history books talking about this many people being hurt by a single event. >> ironically the event happened the same day an astroid buzzed by earth closer than an astroid has since scientists started monitoring them 15 years ago. it missed earth by more than 17,000 miles coming closer than weather and communication satellites that orbit our planet. >> they not related. they're going to do more studies, but right now nasa said they don't think it's related. >> so the meteor and astroid just a strange coincidence according to scientists. in case you're wondering as we did, what's the deal with all those dashcams in the cars of average folks like you and me? turns out they're popular in russia for several reasons including disputes over traffic accidents. insurance fraud is apparently a big problem there. we're also looking at how this story f
that provide cell phone service. you can track it beginning at 2:00 this afternoon. log on to nasa's live stream to take a look. >> a nightmare for many. it's finally over as the carnival triumph crew ships was pushed back into port overnight. >> it docked in mobile alabama after being stranded at sea for several days. now passengers are making their way home. let's check in with brianne carter in a satellite center with more from a local passenger who was on the ship, giving us more perspective on the conditions. >> imagine the emotions, finally being able to get off the cruise ship. one local woman tried to stay positive and is excited to be headed back to arlington. some passengers say even though they finally have docked, there was more drama because they have to wait hours before they could finally get on land. waving and cheering, thousands onboard a carnival cruise ship stuck at see for days, they celebrated as they finally docked. >> after being on that boat for that long and not knowing how we were getting back, it's so good to be back. but there were a lot of unhappy people on t
to nasa's jet propulsion laboratory, where they're keeping a close eye on what's going on. >> wolf, we're inside the deep space network operation center at the jet propulsion laboratory at nasa's facility in pasadena, california. it's at the jet propulsion lab, where nasa will be monitoring that asteroid. it's called 2012 da-14, because it was discovered last year. that's an artist rendering of it, but they're going to be looking at the real thing when it passes very close to earth on friday, mid-day. it's going to pass within about 17,200 miles of earth. that's a lot closer than the moon is to the earth. it's also within the satellite ring. about 5,000 miles within the ring of satellites that hover above the earth's surface. what can we really expect from that asteroid has it passes close to earth? i'm here with paul, a research astronomer with nasa's near-earth object program. paul, let's get this out of the way. does this threaten earth? is it going to impact earth? >> no, we've been tracking this closely for a year and we know it will not hit the earth. >> what about the satellites
in the tracking? >> the good thing is that nasa and other agencies have been diligent about tracking this asteroid for some time now, so they have very good data on what the orbital pass of this is, and they can tell within a very few hundred feet or so, maybe a few hundred miles, how close this is to earth, and they know for sure that it won't come any closer than 17,150. that's pretty good. it's great they do that because they can look at other potentials like this too. >> we can be that accurate about its size and its pass of the earth, but let's get to this $200 billion number about what its cost would be worth. how do we get to that number? how do we put a price tag on this asteroid? >> well, you know, we could look at the composition ofas resides and figure out what their value is according to their mineral worth. if we could actually mine them and, of course, that's another story altogether, but when we think about the kind of minerals that we find there, some of them very rare ones that we need here on earth or that we use quite extentively here on earth, and we have somewhat limited suppl
. officials from the faa and nasa are expected to testify. live coverage 10 a.m. eastern on our companion network c-span3. >> thursday at a senate banking hearing committee on dodd-frank financial regulations senator elizabeth warren of massachusetts, thomas curry, about prosecuting big banks when they break the law. here's a portion of the event. >> thank you very much, mr. chairman. thank you, ranking member. it's good to be here. thank you all for editing. i sat what he said. it's harder than look so i appreciate your being you. i want to ask a question about supervising banks when they break the law. including the mortgage foreclosure of others as well. we all understand why settlements are important, that trials are expensive and we can't dedicate huge resources to them. but we also understand that it's a party is unwilling to go to trial, either because it's too timid are because they lack resources, that the consequence is that a lot less leverage in all the settlements that occur. now, i know there's been some landmark settlements but we face a very special issues with big financi
? nasa says it was likely a meteor. not a space rock that streaked across skies over russia where 1,000 are recovering from injuries. the damage estimate for that, $33 million. and that happened on the same day that an asteroid half the size of a football field did a drive-by, passing 17,000 miles above earth. dr. hakin oleshegy is a scientist at the florida institute of technology and spokesperson for the science channel. nice to have you with us this morning. >> good morning. i'm happy to be here. >> first we need to clear up a few thing. initially we were calling that space rock in russia a meteorite. but it actually of an asteroid as well as the other one. >> well, you know, the naming of these rocks is kind of interesting, right? this object originated in the asteroid belt, so it is an asteroid. when it became streaking through our skies, we call it a meteor. then when it became a fireball, we called it a bolide. when the part hit the ground, fragments, we call those meteorites. >> i think i followed all that. >> yeah. >> you started off with the fact that it came from the aste
information about the meteor that exploded on friday. nasa says the meteor was bigger than originally thought. they say the fire ball was 55 feet wide and weighed about 10,000 tons. it was traveling at 40,000 miles per hour when it exploded over siberia. >>> and another milestone for michael jordan. the basketball legend turns 50 today. happy birthday, m.j. >>> that was the pope this morning speaking from his window at the vatican while thousands of people gathered at st. peteers square. this is the pope's second to last sunday before retirement. the pope announced last week he is stepping down by the end of the month. anne thompson with more ont that. >> reporter: more than 50,000 people came to hear the pope. that is double the size of last week's crowd. he spoke to them in six different languages thanking them for their prayers and support and added in his native german that these were difficult days and the crowd in turn responded with respect and affection. in rome where there is no shortage of must-see attractions suddenly elderly pope benedict is number one on everyone's list. today he
aviation, nasa, and the government accountability office. >> i think women themselves and many cases were interested in politics but had no vehicle to express that in their own lives so they were attracted to men who were going to become politically attractive or were already politically active it. >> i think i find them intriguing. half of them precisely because they are so obscure historical. half of these women probably would be almost totally unrecognizable to most men and women on the street. >> this season -- c-span deviate's its series, "first lady's." and exploring the lives of the women who served as first ladies from martha washington to michelle obama. season one begins at 9:00 eastern and pacific on that c- span, suspend radio, and c- span.org. >> president obama proposed working with states to provide -- he went to georgia which has statewide prekindergarten. this is 16 minutes. [applause] >> hello, everybody. it is great to be in georgia. i cannot imagine a more romantic way to spend valentine's day than with all of you and all the press here. michele says hello. she made me
saw something strange in the sky last night, a streaking flash of light. nasa tells us it could have been another meteor or some sort of space debris burning up as it entered the atmosphere. fortunately, nobody was hurt in california. >>> some new details about christopher dorner's last moments. an autopsy showed the former l.a. cop died of a single gunshot to the head. they say at this point it looks like it was self-inflicted. dorner locked himself in a cabin that caught fire during the final standoff with police. >>> a new pope before easter? could pop. pope benedict xvi will step down at the end of the month. current rules make march 15th the earliest possible date to pick a new pope but the vet kat says the date could be pushed up if all of the cardinals make it to rome early for a vote. >>> weary passengers from a carnival cruise ship "triumph" today are adjusting to being back on dry land with running water and working toilets. the passengers finally departed the crippled ship early friday in mobile, alabama, the more than 4,200 passengers and crew were then taken to new orlea
katrina, sandy reshaped the coastline and devastated homes, businesses and lives. nasa says the evidence shows humans are contributing to global warming. still, the realities in washington test the bounds of how we as a nation respond. in his state of the union address, the president told members of congress that if they don't act, he will. >> eye will direct my cabinet to come up with actions we can take to reduce pollution, prepare communities for climate change, and speed the transition to more sustainable sources of energy. >> last year president obama rejected a permit to build the keystone pipeline. but democrats are torn between a base of supporters who strongly oppose the project and the potential business boom by adding thousands of new jobs into the work force. that permit now rests in the hands of the state department, and secretary john kerry, who in august suggested climate change is as dangerous as iran, nuclear weapons, and war. now, on february 8, kerry met with canada's foreign minister, and he promised a fair, transparent and prompt decision on that. i don't know. it's
Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)